Oak Cliff Art Crawl’s ‘Better Block’ to show what Tyler Street could be

The vision that business owners and neighbors have for the Tyler Street block that includes the Oak Cliff Bicycle Co. and Mighty Fine Arts has outgrown what city regulations will allow. Zoning regulations requiring parking spaces, for example, prevent businesses such as a coffee shop or pub opening on that block.

So as part of the second Oak Cliff Art Crawl April 10-11, the "Better Block" project will show the world what the neighborhood could be. As co-organizer Holly Jefferson puts it, "we’ll be taking a car-centric four lane street with poor zoning and restrictive development ordinances, and convert it into a people-friendly neighborhood block."

There will be temporary, "pop-up" businesses such as a flower shop, newsstand, cafe and kids’ art studio.



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  • Wendi

    I agree with urban, “Temporary businesses are fine except when they harm nearby non-temporary businesses and the quality of life for the residents who live around them.”

    Many of the existing business in the Tyler/Davis Art District were not included in the planning, or even made aware, of this upcoming event. Without the existing pioneering businesses in the area there would be no place for this so event to occur.

    Inclusivity is never a bad idea and in keeping with new urbanism that this group says it advocates. Let’s all practice what we preach.

  • Urban

    I hope they aren’t advocating self-serving zoning concepts. Requiring customers to park in front of residencies and other businesses is old again and the most dreaded aspect of living in a neighborhood with poor planning. Temporary businesses are fine except when they harm nearby non-temporary businesses and the quality of life for the residents who live around them.

    Benefitting at the expense of others has never been a concept of new urbanism. Change is good except when naive and self-serving concepts are falsely wrapped with a new urbanism label.

    Does every person advocating unrestrictive parking ordinances have commercial parking in front of their own house?

  • John Rose

    What a fantastic idea!