Photography by Danny Fulgencio

Ana Christa Robles started licking stamps and block walking for Ron Kirk’s first campaign for Dallas Mayor in 1994 when she was still a teenager. The experience fostered her passion for the community. She later volunteered for Mega Voto, helping her neighbors pursue citizenship and register to vote. She was asked to join the League of Women Voters and the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas, a nonprofit focused on mentorships and empowering women. She is now chair of the Dallas chapter. Robles is now the chair of Latinas in Progress’ Dallas Chapter. A graduate of Dallas ISD, she is a first-generation college student. “What resonates with me is women’s empowerment and education,” she says. “I want to make sure that everyone has the same access that I had. Equality is so important. Education is an equalizer, and I don’t think people always realize that.”

Ana Christa Robles

Her third place in the neighborhood, after home and work: Victor Hugo’s Oak Cliff Casual Dining & Bar. Victor is incredible and an amazing advocate for women. The Santa Barbara breeze cocktail made me book a trip to Santa Barbara.

An accomplishment she’s proud of in her career: My community relationships. There are so many good people doing great things in Oak Cliff and the city at large from education, gentrification and immigration. I’ve met so many phenomenal women and men by participating in organizations like the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas, the Mayor’s Star Council, League of Women Voters Dallas, Oak Cliff Coalition for the Arts and other initiatives promoting the arts, citizenship, education and civic engagement.

The most challenging thing she’s overcome in her career: Public speaking. I’m always willing to pass the mic to someone else.

Misconceptions people have about the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas: That it caters to just one demographic. Our organization is a dynamic, multigenerational network composed of women from 17 to 77.  These women are students, lawyers, bankers, marketing and advertising gurus, educators. The diversity within our membership is off the charts.

Photo by Danny Fulgencio

What she’s proud of besides work: My godchildren. They are all excelling in their own way.

The best advice she ever received: From Joe Robles, my grandfather: To serve, not to be served; find a mentor and do what they’re doing. 

The best gift she ever received: Mentorship. I’m always learning from those who came before me.  

Advice she would give her younger self: Focus. What they think about you is not your business.

Advice she would give to someone who wants to go into advocacy: Lead with your heart, not your ego.

How she would like to be remembered: I’d like to be remembered as a servant leader. That’s what I value the most.

Items she finds essential at work: I keep a stack of thank-you cards. Nothing carries sentiment more than a personal note.

Other items essential to everyday life: Café con leche.  

How she achieves work-life balance: I struggle with this but try to remind myself it’ll all be there tomorrow.

How she relaxes: Brunch, cocktails and retail therapy with family and friends.

If she could have dinner with any living person: America Ferrera. She is a girl with grit. She’s able to get her message across with eloquence and grace.

The biggest problem our community faces: Overlooking that we all want the same thing: a better, inclusive Oak Cliff.

How she would spend $1 million on our community: Advocacy and leadership programming at local recreation and community centers. The future is here; we just need to help develop it.

Her third place in the neighborhood, after home and work: Victor Hugo’s Oak Cliff Casual Dining & Bar. Victor is incredible and an amazing advocate for women. The Santa Barbara breeze cocktail made me book a trip to Santa Barbara.

An accomplishment she’s proud of in her career: My community relationships. There are so many good people doing great things in Oak Cliff and the city at large from education, gentrification and immigration. I’ve met so many phenomenal women and men by participating in organizations like the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas, the Mayor’s Star Council, League of Women Voters Dallas, Oak Cliff Coalition for the Arts and other initiatives promoting the arts, citizenship, education and civic engagement.

The most challenging thing she’s overcome in her career: Public speaking. I’m always willing to pass the mic to someone else.

Misconceptions people have about the Hispanic Women’s Network of North Texas: That it caters to just one demographic. Our organization is a dynamic, multigenerational network composed of women from 17 to 77.  These women are students, lawyers, bankers, marketing and advertising gurus, educators. The diversity within our membership is off the charts.

Photo by Danny Fulgencio

What she’s proud of besides work: My godchildren. They are all excelling in their own way.

The best advice she ever received: From Joe Robles, my grandfather: To serve, not to be served; find a mentor and do what they’re doing. 

The best gift she ever received: Mentorship. I’m always learning from those who came before me.  

Advice she would give her younger self: Focus. What they think about you is not your business.

Advice she would give to someone who wants to go into advocacy: Lead with your heart, not your ego.

How she would like to be remembered: I’d like to be remembered as a servant leader. That’s what I value the most.

Items she finds essential at work: I keep a stack of thank-you cards. Nothing carries sentiment more than a personal note.

Other items essential to everyday life: Café con leche.  

How she achieves work-life balance: I struggle with this but try to remind myself it’ll all be there tomorrow.

How she relaxes: Brunch, cocktails and retail therapy with family and friends.

If she could have dinner with any living person: America Ferrera. She is a girl with grit. She’s able to get her message across with eloquence and grace.

The biggest problem our community faces: Overlooking that we all want the same thing: a better, inclusive Oak Cliff.

How she would spend $1 million on our community: Advocacy and leadership programming at local recreation and community centers. The future is here; we just need to help develop it.

Her third place in the neighborhood, after home and work: Victor Hugo’s Oak Cliff Casual Dining & Bar. Victor is incredible and an amazing advocate for women. The Santa Barbara breeze cocktail made me book a trip to Santa Barbara.

An accomplishment she’s proud of in her career: My community relationships. There are so many good people doing great things in Oak Cliff and the city at large from education, gentrification and immigration. I’ve met so many phenomenal women and men by participating in organizations like the Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas, the Mayor’s Star Council, League of Women Voters Dallas, Oak Cliff Coalition for the Arts and other initiatives promoting the arts, citizenship, education and civic engagement.

The most challenging thing she’s overcome in her career: Public speaking. I’m always willing to pass the mic to someone else.

Misconceptions people have about the Hispanic Women’s Network of North Texas: That it caters to just one demographic. Our organization is a dynamic, multigenerational network composed of women from 17 to 77.  These women are students, lawyers, bankers, marketing and advertising gurus, educators. The diversity within our membership is off the charts.

Photo by Danny Fulgencio

What she’s proud of besides work: My godchildren. They are all excelling in their own way.

The best advice she ever received: From Joe Robles, my grandfather: To serve, not to be served; find a mentor and do what they’re doing. 

The best gift she ever received: Mentorship. I’m always learning from those who came before me.  

Advice she would give her younger self: Focus. What they think about you is not your business.

Advice she would give to someone who wants to go into advocacy: Lead with your heart, not your ego.

How she would like to be remembered: I’d like to be remembered as a servant leader. That’s what I value the most.

Items she finds essential at work: I keep a stack of thank-you cards. Nothing carries sentiment more than a personal note.

Other items essential to everyday life: Café con leche.  

How she achieves work-life balance: I struggle with this but try to remind myself it’ll all be there tomorrow.

How she relaxes: Brunch, cocktails and retail therapy with family and friends.

If she could have dinner with any living person: America Ferrera. She is a girl with grit. She’s able to get her message across with eloquence and grace.

The biggest problem our community faces: Overlooking that we all want the same thing: a better, inclusive Oak Cliff.

How she would spend $1 million on our community: Advocacy and leadership programming at local recreation and community centers. The future is here; we just need to help develop it.