Wine review: Mouton Cadet Blanc 2009

A long time ago, before livestock wines and malbecs from Argentina, Americans drank cheap French wine. And one of the most important cheap French wines came from Mouton Cadet. Mouton was part of Le Famille Rothschild, which included Mouton Rothschild, a Bordeaux first growth that was (and still is) one of the great wines of the world. I’m not sure those of us who drank the Cadet understood what that meant, but the label was classy and we were drinking French wine — which was a big deal 30 years ago.

These days, Mouton is not what it used to be. It’s still a major brand, but it’s just another of many major brands. Much has changed since Mouton’s heyday in the late 1970s and early 1980s, and the Australians, Chileans and Argentines have mostly replaced the French as the world’s source of cheap wine.

In fact, I have been debating whether to review the Cadet for a couple of months, and have always passed. I didn’t have the heart to buy the wine, taste it, and discover that another part of my past was gone. Still, when Mouton sent samples this fall, I decided to take a chance.

I’m glad I did. The Cadet ($10, sample, widely available) has changed significantly since the old days. It’s more fruit forward, with a lemony-grapefruit flavor more reminiscent of Chilean sauvignon blanc than the typical slate and minerality of a white Bordeaux. This change is aimed at the modern American palate, and it pretty much works. I don’t know that I like the new style better than the old, but the Cadet offers $10 worth of value. And that’s the important thing.


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